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Clean Cooking Forum 2022

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Abass Ibrahim Tasunti

Head of Economic Regulation, National Petroleum Authority, Ghana

Abass Ibrahim Tasunti is the Head of Economic Regulation at the National Petroleum Authority (NPA), Ghana. He has over 11 years of experience in the petroleum downstream industry. His job role includes ensuring the efficient pricing of petroleum products and promoting fair competition amongst players in the petroleum downstream industry in Ghana.

He has been instrumental in the implementation of key policies in Ghana’s petroleum downstream industry, among which are the Price Deregulation and the Sulphur Reduction Policies. He has served and still serves on several committees, including the National Technical Committee on Petroleum and Petroleum Products, the National Fuel Quality Policy Committee, and the National LPG Policy Implementation Committee, among others.

He holds an MBA in Finance from the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA), a B. A. in Psychology from the University of Ghana, and several professional Certificates, including Economics for Managers from Harvard Business School. He also has undertaken courses on International Oil Trading, Supply, Transportation, Refining and Pricing from Mennta Energy Solutions in the UK.

Day 0 October 10
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Day 1 October 11
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Day 2 October 12
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
1:45 pm-2:30 pm
Breakout Room C

Friend or Foe - The Role of End-user Subsidies in Developing Clean Cooking Markets

Opinion on the role of end-user subsidies for high quality stove and fuels (e.g. ISO Tier 4-5 for efficiency and emissions) stoves and fuels is often divided into two camps; those who view end-user subsidies, especially freely distributed stoves, as inappropriate tools that risk reducing willingness to pay and distorting market structures, and those that see end-user subsidies as a necessary tool to ensure that socially beneficial solutions like clean cooking are accessible at the last mile and affordable for those at the base of the pyramid. While subsidies typically provide a partial reduction in price, the recent revival of carbon markets is making 100% subsidies on clean cooking products more common in the clean cooking industry. In light of national experiences with household energy subsidies in places like Ecuador, India, and Indonesia, it is opportune to better understand the risks and opportunities of end-user subsidies in the development of sustainable clean cooking markets.

The first part of the session will be structured as a debate with panelists responding to the proposition “Large end-user subsidies for high quality stoves and fuels do more harm than good in the development of sustainable clean cooking markets”.

The second part of the session will be a moderated discussion between the panelists based on some of the views presented during the debate, rebuttals, brainstorming about how smart, targeted subsidies might change the equation, and questions from the audience.

Watch this session.

Speakers
Jan Cloin Coordinator, Energizing Development, Netherlands Enterprise Agency
Abass Ibrahim Tasunti Head of Economic Regulation, National Petroleum Authority, Ghana
Darby Jack Associate Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Martin Kimani Managing Director, M-Gas Limited
Juliet Pumpuni Senior Energy Specialist, World Bank
Day 3 October 13
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Day 4 October 14
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
1:45 pm-2:30 pm
Breakout Room C

Friend or Foe - The Role of End-user Subsidies in Developing Clean Cooking Markets

Opinion on the role of end-user subsidies for high quality stove and fuels (e.g. ISO Tier 4-5 for efficiency and emissions) stoves and fuels is often divided into two camps; those who view end-user subsidies, especially freely distributed stoves, as inappropriate tools that risk reducing willingness to pay and distorting market structures, and those that see end-user subsidies as a necessary tool to ensure that socially beneficial solutions like clean cooking are accessible at the last mile and affordable for those at the base of the pyramid. While subsidies typically provide a partial reduction in price, the recent revival of carbon markets is making 100% subsidies on clean cooking products more common in the clean cooking industry. In light of national experiences with household energy subsidies in places like Ecuador, India, and Indonesia, it is opportune to better understand the risks and opportunities of end-user subsidies in the development of sustainable clean cooking markets.

The first part of the session will be structured as a debate with panelists responding to the proposition “Large end-user subsidies for high quality stoves and fuels do more harm than good in the development of sustainable clean cooking markets”.

The second part of the session will be a moderated discussion between the panelists based on some of the views presented during the debate, rebuttals, brainstorming about how smart, targeted subsidies might change the equation, and questions from the audience.

Watch this session.

Speakers
Jan Cloin Coordinator, Energizing Development, Netherlands Enterprise Agency
Abass Ibrahim Tasunti Head of Economic Regulation, National Petroleum Authority, Ghana
Darby Jack Associate Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Martin Kimani Managing Director, M-Gas Limited
Juliet Pumpuni Senior Energy Specialist, World Bank
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti
Sessions by Abass Ibrahim Tasunti